Section: Welfare Benefits

NAO questions whether Universal Credit will ever deliver value for money

Posted 18.06.18
National Audit Office: Article link

Universal Credit has taken significantly longer to roll-out than intended, may cost more than the benefits system it replaces, and the Department for Work and Pensions (the Department) will never be able to measure whether it has achieved its stated goal of increasing employment.

In a new report, the National Audit Office (NAO) concludes that Universal Credit has not delivered value for money and it is uncertain that it ever will.

Since the NAO last reported on Universal Credit in 2014, the Department has made some progress in managing the programme but has itself admitted that it cannot measure whether Universal Credit will lead to its economic aim of getting an additional 200,000 people into work.

Universal Credit may also cost more to administer than the previous system of benefits it replaces, with current running costs at £699 per claim, against an ambition of £173 per claim by 2024-25.

The roll-out has been considerably slower than was initially intended. It was due to complete in October 2017, but after a number of problems, eight years later only around 10% of the final expected caseload are currently claiming Universal Credit.


Keyfacts


Keep up-to-date with issues affecting the social and affordable housing sectors


News and views reported in summary format, with links for further reading


Recognisable sub-sections for easy access - now and at a future date


An essential free resource for anyone with a busy daily schedule



Enter your email address to receive our e-newsletters advising on updates to KeyFacts

We will not share your email address with others or use it for any other purpose

Reporting on June 2018

Site Sections

Bookmark and Share

Current Issue